Heparin (blood thinner) vs LMWH (low molecular weight heparin)

Heparin Sodium in 5% Dextrose Injection
Used July 25-26 (stopped ~9AM)
Molecular weight: 1039.9 g/mol

Low molecular weight heparin (wikipedia)
Patients with cancer are at higher risk of venous thromboembolism and LMWHs are used to reduce this risk.[10] The CLOT study, published in 2003, showed that, in patients with malignancy and acute venous thromboembolism, dalteparin was more effective than warfarin in reducing the risk of recurrent embolic events.[11] Use of LMWH in cancer patients for at least the first 3 to 6 months of long-term treatment is recommended in numerous guidelines and is now regarded as a standard of care.[10]

Note (JJJ): Delteparin (Tinzaparin) and Nadroparin are better than Warfarin.

reference: [10] Nishioka J, Goodin S (2007). “Low-molecular-weight heparin in cancer-associated thrombosis: treatment, secondary prevention, and survival”. Journal of Oncology Pharmacy Practice13 (2): 85–97.doi:10.1177/1078155207079169PMID17873108.

stoptheclots.org

LMWH is also the favored treatment for cancer-related blood clots, since it has been shown to be more effective than warfarin (tablet).

LMWH is often used temporarily to help patients transition – or bridge – to long-term oral anticoagulant therapy, most commonly warfarin or Coumadin®. Your doctor will usually add warfarin to your medication schedule, so you take both warfarin and LMWH for several days under careful monitoring. Once your body achieves therapeutic blood levels of warfarin, your doctor will discontinue LMWH injections.

As with UFH, let your doctor know if you are taking aspirin, other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) – such as ibuprofen or naproxen – or clopidogrel before starting LMWH treatment, because these drugs increase the risk of bleeding.

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